10 tips to help you pass the MRCGP AKT exam

The MRCGP AKT exam is a challenging exam, testing applied knowledge relevant to UK general practice. In this article, Dr Mahibur Rahman discusses some key tips to help you prepare for and pass the exam.

  1. Understand the basics

The exam lasts 3 hours and 10 minutes, and consists of 200 questions. 80% of the questions relate to clinical medicine, 10% to evidence based practice, and 10% the organisational domain. The exam is computerised, and there is now access to a basic on-screen calculator if needed. The majority of questions are single best answer and extended matching questions. Other formats include algorithm questions, short answer (you type the correct answer into a box), video questions, and picture based questions.

  1. Fail to prepare, prepare to fail

Allow enough time to revise all material in the exam – most candidates need 3 or 4 months to be able to cover everything sufficiently well to pass the exam. A common finding amongst candidates that failed the exam is that they had not realised how long it would take to prepare, and did not have enough time to complete their revision. The curriculum is large and covers a broad range of topics – try to have a systematic approach to allow you to cover all the important topics adequately. The RCGP has produced an AKT topic review which details the key areas and subjects covered in the exam.  The MPS has produced a more concise checklist of key topics that frequently feature in the exam as part of their free MRCGP Study Guide.

  1. Focus on the clinical domain

Aim to spend the majority of your revision focusing on the clinical domain – this makes up 80% of the marks and questions (160 questions). Someone who scored very poorly in this area (under 60%) would usually fail the exam – even with 100% in the other domains. Overall, a poor score in this domain is the most common cause of failure in the AKT exam. This domain also takes the longest amount of time to cover as the bulk of the curriculum is focused on clinical topics. Questions from the clinical domain can include those relating to making a diagnosis, ordering and interpreting tests, disease factors and risks, and management. It is important to have a good knowledge of key guidelines – NICE, SIGN, BTS etc. for common and important disease areas as they are frequently tested.

  1. Revise core statistics and evidence based practice

10% of the exam is evidence based medicine, including basic statistics, graphs and charts and types of study. These offer easy marks if you make sure you have a good grasp of the basic concepts and can interpret common charts and graphs. Make sure you can calculate averages (mean, mode, median), numbers needed to treat, sensitivity and specificity as well as understanding absolute and relative risk, odds ratios, p values, 95% confidence intervals and standard deviation. You should be able to interpret scatter plots, L’Abbe plots, Forest plots, funnel plots as well as Cates plots. Finally, you should be able to understand the usage of common study types including cross sectional surveys, case control studies, cohort studies and randomised controlled trials.

  1. Don’t forget the organisational domain

This makes up another 10% of the exam, and is the area that candidates tend to do worst on. These areas can be dull to read, but learning about practice management, QOF, certification, DVLA guidelines and legal duties of doctors will not only get you easy marks, it will be useful when you qualify.

  1. Learn from other people’s mistakes

Read through the examiners’ feedback reports to see which topics caused trainees problems, as they are usually retested in the next few exams. Having analysed every feedback report published so far, it is interesting to note that the same subjects get featured repeatedly! In the last feedback report, there was not a single topic that had not already featured as an area of poor performance in a previous report.

  1. Make the most of your revision time

shutterstock_247056754Effective revision should combine reading with practising questions. Try to practise questions to time, as time pressure is a big issue with this exam – you have about 57 seconds for each question! If you get a question wrong, try to read more broadly about the subject to gain a deeper understanding. By relating it to a question you have just answered, you are more likely to retain the information. Concentration drops dramatically after an hour, so try to revise in chunks of no more than an hour at a time. Take a short break – even 10 minutes to make a hot drink, or get some fresh air is often enough to refresh you and improve concentration for the next burst of revision.

  1. Learn the subject, not the question

Some candidates approach AKT revision by picking an online revision service and then go through all the questions multiple times. This can lead to a false sense of security and ultimately failure in the exam. Repeating the SAME questions multiple times provides very little additional benefit. Often complex questions such as data interpretation are answered the second time by remembering the pattern rather than understanding the subject. In the exam, you will not get the same question, but a different one testing knowledge of the subject. While your mark will improve with each repeated attempt at the same questions, your knowledge may have only improved marginally (having seen the correct answers the first time, it is not surprising that you get most of them correct the next time). A better approach is to read up on the subjects and explanations after doing a set of questions, and then once you complete all the questions, move on to a different set of questions from a different service or book. This will give you a better idea of how well you have understood the topic and retained the knowledge.

  1. Read the question carefully

Many candidates that have a good knowledge base still fail the AKT by a few marks. This can be owing to poor exam technique. It is really important to read the question carefully to prevent losing marks for silly mistakes. This can relate to the instructions – some questions ask you to drag the right answer into a certain part of the screen. Clicking the right answer instead of dragging it will gain no marks. It is important to watch out for and to understand certain keywords – if the question asks for a characteristic feature, it means it is there in almost every case (90% or more) – whereas if it asks for a feature that is commonly seen in a condition, it only needs to be there in around 60% or more of cases. Some questions are negatively framed – “which of the following is not part of the criteria for diagnosing irritable bowel syndrome?” – candidates that fail to spot the “not” in this question could easily select the wrong answer despite knowing the criteria.

  1. Keep to time

To complete the entire paper, you have just 57 seconds per question. Try to be disciplined – if you are not entirely sure of the best answer, it is better to put down your best guess after about 55 seconds and move on. You can flag questions for review, so you could try to come back if you finish a little early to look at those are unsure of. By being strict with your time, you will at least pick up all the easy marks for topics that you have covered in your revision. Candidates that spend 2-3 minutes struggling with a few really challenging questions often end up unable to complete the paper. They may have missed easy marks from questions at the end of the paper that they did not see. It is useful to have some pace checkpoints – try to finish 33 questions every 30 minutes. At this pace, you will have completed 66 questions after 1 hour, 99 at 1.5 hours, and complete the whole paper with just under 10 minutes left to go over any questions flagged earlier.

Summary

The MRCGP AKT is a challenging exam with a significant failure rate – over 1 in 4 candidates fail each exam, with the long term mean pass rate around 73%. It covers a large curriculum, so it is important to allow enough time and to have a plan to enable you to prepare in a systematic way. A lot of the knowledge gained from preparing will help you not only in everyday practice, but also for the MRCGP CSA examination. By mixing reading with practice questions, you should have both the knowledge and the exam technique to allow you to pass well.

Dr Mahibur Rahman is a portfolio GP and a consultant in medical education. He has been the medical director of Emedica since 2005 and has taught over 30,000 delegates preparing for GP entry exams, MRCGP and on GP careers. He teaches an intensive 1 day MRCGP AKT preparation course in London, Birmingham and Manchester that covers all 3 domains. The course includes key theory and high yield topics, exam technique as well as mock exams in timed conditions. You can get a £25 discount by using the code passmrcgp

Details of the course are available at http://courses.emedica.co.uk/acatalog/nMRCGP_AKT_Preparation.html

MRCGP AKT Course

MRCGP AKT Examination – an overview

The AKT (Applied Knowledge Test) is one of the assessments required to gain Membership of the Royal College of General Practitioners (MRCGP) and can be taken in ST2 or ST3 years of GP training. It is available 3 times each year, in October, January and April. Most candidates sit the exam for the first time at some point in ST2.

The examination questions are all drawn from the GP Curriculum, and the test is completed on computer at a Pearson Vue professional testing centre (there are centres all over the UK).

The exam lasts for 3 hours and 10 minutes and consists of around 200 questions. You can mark questions for review later to go back over those that you are unsure of.

The pass rate is variable and based on a set pass standard for each exam, with a variable pass mark that has ranged from as low as 67% to as high as 71.5% (average is around 68%). The pass rate has a long term mean of just over 73%.

Question formats

studying girlThe majority of questions are Extended matching questions (EMQs) and Single Best Answer questions (SBAs). Other question formats include Multiple Best Answer (MBA), Algorithm questions, seminal trial questions (focusing on important research relevant to primary care), picture questions, video questions and short answer questions.

The makeup of the exam is:

  • 80% – Clinical medicine relevant to GP
  • 10% – Critical appraisal / evidence based practice
  • 10% – Health informatics and administrative issues

The RCGP has produced a set of sample questions you can view the answers alongside the questions here.

Examiner’s reports

The panel of examiners produce a report after each sitting outlining key areas that canidates performed poorly at, and this is very helpful in highlighting important topics to include in your revision. You can access the reports from the RCGP website.

10 tips to help you pass the MRCGP AKT exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman MRCGP AKT exam tips

The MRCGP AKT exam is a challenging exam, testing applied knowledge relevant to UK general practice. In this article, Dr Mahibur Rahman discusses some key tips to help you prepare for and pass the exam.

  1. Understand the basics

The exam lasts 3 hours and 10 minutes, and consists of 200 questions. 80% of the questions relate to clinical medicine, 10% to evidence based practice, and 10% the organisational domain. The exam is computerised, and there is now access to a basic on-screen calculator if needed. The majority of questions are single best answer and extended matching questions. Other formats include algorithm questions, short answer (you type the correct answer into a box), video questions, and picture based questions.

  1. Fail to prepare, prepare to fail

Allow enough time to revise all material in the exam – most candidates need 3 or 4 months to be able to cover everything sufficiently well to pass the exam. We help a lot of candidates prepare when they are resitting the exam – a common finding amongst candidates that failed the exam is that they had not realised how long it would take to prepare, and did not have enough time to complete their revision. The curriculum is large and covers a broad range of topics – try to have a systematic approach to allow you to cover all the important topics adequately. The RCGP has produced an AKT topic review which details the key areas and subjects covered in the exam.  The MPS has produced a more concise checklist of key topics that frequently feature in the exam as part of their free MRCGP Study Guide.

  1. Focus on the clinical domain

Aim to spend the majority of your revision focusing on the clinical domain – this makes up 80% of the marks and questions (160 questions). Someone who scored very poorly in this area (under 60%) would usually fail the exam – even with 100% in the other domains. Overall, a poor score in this domain is the most common cause of failure in the AKT exam. This domain also takes the longest amount of time to cover as the bulk of the curriculum is focused on clinical topics. Questions from the clinical domain can include those relating to making a diagnosis, ordering and interpreting tests, disease factors and risks, and management. It is important to have a good knowledge of key guidelines – NICE, SIGN, BTS etc. for common and important disease areas as they are frequently tested.

  1. Revise core statistics and evidence based practice

10% of the exam is evidence based medicine, including basic statistics, graphs and charts and types of study. These offer easy marks if you make sure you have a good grasp of the basic concepts and can interpret common charts and graphs. Make sure you can calculate averages (mean, mode, median), numbers needed to treat, sensitivity and specificity as well as understanding absolute and relative risk, odds ratios, p values, 95% confidence intervals and standard deviation. You should be able to interpret scatter plots, L’Abbe plots, Forest plots, funnel plots as well as Cates plots. Finally, you should be able to understand the usage of common study types including cross sectional surveys, case control studies, cohort studies and randomised controlled trials.

  1. Don’t forget the organisational domain

This makes up another 10% of the exam, and is the area that candidates tend to do worst on. These areas can be dull to read, but learning about practice management, QOF, certification, DVLA guidelines and legal duties of doctors will not only get you easy marks, it will be useful when you qualify.

  1. Learn from other people’s mistakes

Read through the examiners’ feedback reports to see which topics caused trainees problems, as they are usually retested in the next few exams. Having analysed every feedback report published so far, it is interesting to note that the same subjects get featured repeatedly! In the last feedback report, there was not a single topic that had not already featured as an area of poor performance in a previous report.

  1. Make the most of your revision time

Effective revision should combine reading with practising questions. Try to practise questions to time, as time pressure is a big issue with this exam – you have about 57 seconds for each question! If you get a question wrong, try to read more broadly about the subject to gain a deeper understanding. By relating it to a question you have just answered, you are more likely to retain the information. Concentration drops dramatically after an hour, so try to revise in chunks of no more than an hour at a time. Take a short break – even 10 minutes to make a hot drink, or get some fresh air is often enough to refresh you and improve concentration for the next burst of revision.

  1. Learn the subject, not the question

Some candidates approach AKT revision by picking an online revision service and then go through all the questions multiple times. This can lead to a false sense of security and ultimately failure in the exam. Repeating the SAME questions multiple times provides very little additional benefit. Often complex questions such as data interpretation are answered the second time by remembering the pattern rather than understanding the subject. In the exam, you will not get the same question, but a different one testing knowledge of the subject. While your mark will improve with each repeated attempt at the same questions, your knowledge may have only improved marginally (having seen the correct answers the first time, it is not surprising that you get most of them correct the next time). A better approach is to read up on the subjects and explanations after doing a set of questions, and then once you complete all the questions, move on to a different set of questions from a different service or book. This will give you a better idea of how well you have understood the topic and retained the knowledge.

  1. Read the question carefully

Many candidates that have a good knowledge base still fail the AKT by a few marks. This can be owing to poor exam technique. It is really important to read the question carefully to prevent losing marks for silly mistakes. This can relate to the instructions – some questions ask you to drag the right answer into a certain part of the screen. Clicking the right answer instead of dragging it will gain no marks. It is important to watch out for and to understand certain keywords – if the question asks for a characteristic feature, it means it is there in almost every case (90% or more) – whereas if it asks for a feature that is commonly seen in a condition, it only needs to be there in around 60% or more of cases. Some questions are negatively framed – “which of the following is not part of the Rome III criteria for diagnosing irritable bowel syndrome?” – candidates that fail to spot the “not” in this question could easily select the wrong answer despite knowing the Rome III criteria.

  1. Keep to time

To complete the entire paper, you have just 57 seconds per question. Try to be disciplined – if you are not entirely sure of the best answer, it is better to put down your best guess after about 55 seconds and move on. You can flag questions for review, so you could try to come back if you finish a little early to look at those are unsure of. By being strict with your time, you will at least pick up all the easy marks for topics that you have covered in your revision. Candidates that spend 2-3 minutes struggling with a few really challenging questions often end up unable to complete the paper. They may have missed easy marks from questions at the end of the paper that they did not see. It is useful to have some pace checkpoints – try to finish 33 questions every 30 minutes. At this pace, you will have completed 66 questions after 1 hour, 99 at 1.5 hours, and complete the whole paper with just under 10 minutes left to go over any questions flagged earlier.

Summary

The MRCGP AKT is a challenging exam with a significant failure rate – over 1 in 4 candidates fail each exam, with the long term mean pass rate around 73%. It covers a large curriculum, so it is important to allow enough time and to have a plan to enable you to prepare in a systematic way. A lot of the knowledge gained from preparing will help you not only in everyday practice, but also for the MRCGP CSA examination. By mixing reading with practice questions, you should have both the knowledge and the exam technique to allow you to pass well.

Dr Mahibur Rahman is a portfolio GP and a consultant in medical education. He has been the medical director of Emedica since 2005 and has taught over 20,000 delegates preparing for GP entry exams, MRCGP and on GP careers. He teaches an intensive 1 day MRCGP AKT preparation course in London, Birmingham and Manchester that covers all 3 domains and includes key theory and high yield topics, exam technique as well as mock exams in timed conditions. Details of the course are available at http://courses.emedica.co.uk/acatalog/nMRCGP_AKT_Preparation.html

akt_course

MRCGP AKT exam 2014 – key changes

MRCGP AKT Mock ExamDr Mahibur Rahman

The MRCGP AKT exam was introduced in 2007 as part of the new MRCGP examination. Since then it has been through a few minor changes relating to question formats and the passing standard. From October 2014, some important changes are being implemented. This article looks at the exam format, including the new changes.

Exam basics

The Applied Knowledge Test (AKT) is one part of the MRCGP examination. It can be taken in the ST2 year of training or later. It is a computerised test consisting of 200 questions, and can be attempted a maximum of 4 times. The major change being implemented in 2014 is that the time allowed for the exam is being increased by 10 minutes – candidates will now have 3 hours and 10 minutes to complete the exam. The other change is a minor one – an on screen calculator will be available if needed.

Exam content

The exam is based around UK general practice, with all questions being drawn from areas within the RCGP GP curriculum. The breakdown of the questions are as follows:

  • 80% (160 questions) – clinical medicine relevant to general practice
  • 10% (20 questions) – organisational – this includes administrative issues, medicolegal, practice management, GP contract, certification etc.
  • 10% (20 questions) – evidence based practice – statistics, types of study, graphs and charts etc.

Question formats

The majority of questions (about 90%) are of two formats – extended matching questions (EMQs) and single best answer questions (SBA). Candidates sitting the AKT will be familiar with this type of question from the GP Stage 2 assessments used as part of GP recruitment. The remaining question formats include:

  • Algorithm question – testing knowledge of specific guidelines or protocols – sometimes you will be required to drag the correct answer into the relevant box.
  • Picture question – this will have a scenario with a related image – ranging from an investigation, blood result, audiogram, skin lesion, otoscopy or a photo of a clinical sign.
  • Video question – this will involve a short clip (20 – 30 seconds) with a relevant question. This could show an abnormal gait, a test for a sign, a physical abnormality etc.
  • Seminal trial – this will test knowledge of a specific trial that has had a significant impact on general practice.
  • Rank ordering question – this is a relatively new format, and will ask you to order options from best to worst e.g. most secure password to least secure password
  • Short answer question – this will provide a question and then a blank space into which you have to type the correct answer. Typically the answer will be one or two words.
  • Calculation – this may involve calculating a paediatric drug dosage, converting one opioid to a different formulation, or working out the sensitivity or specificity of a test. The maths is usually limited to basic arithmetic, although an no screen calculator is now available.

Preparation

The AKT is a challenging exam, and most candidates will need at least 3 months revision to be able to cover the entire curriculum thoroughly. Combining reading with practising exam level questions to time will help make your revision more effective. The Emedica AKT preparation course offers comprehensive coverage of the curriculum, with a focus on the challenging areas highlighted by examiners from previous sittings. This includes statistics and evidence based practise made simple, the organisational domain, and over 100 core clinical topics including high yield topics from previous examinations. You can get a £20 discount by using the code alumnimrcgp

Useful links:

RCGP AKT Content Guide

MRCGP AKT tips for effective preparation – from a registrar with the highest score in the country

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the April 2014 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the April 2014 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur RahmanDrug dosage

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting to think about the October 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam at the moment, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the April 2014 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 95%
The mean score was 72.2%
The lowest score was 43%
The pass mark was 67% (this is one of the lowest it has ever been so far)
The pass rate was 72.5%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 72.5%
Evidence interpretation – 73.8%
Organisational – 67.9%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Drug dosage calculations
  • Drugs administered by other health professionals
  • Good Medical Practice – 2013 GMC guidance
  • Contraception – including LARC and drug interactions
  • Acute infections – antibiotics and prophylaxis
  • Mental health – diagnosis and management of anxiety
  • Digestive health – irritable bowel and coeliac disease
  • Death and cremation certification
  • Substance misuse – including treatment of withdrawal symptoms
  • Poisoning – symptoms and management
  • Psoriasis – diagnosis and management

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Our AKT course offers comprehensive coverage of all 3 domains, and is updated after every exam to take account of high yield topics from the examiners’ feedback reports.

Further reading:
Complete Examiners’ report – April 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the January 2014 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the January 2014 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur RahmanHuman eye

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be revising for the April 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam at the moment, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the January 2014 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 95%
The mean score was 75.8%
The lowest score was 39.5%
The pass mark was 70.5% (this is the highest it has ever been so far)
The pass rate was 74.7%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 76.3%
Evidence interpretation – 74.3%
Organisational – 73.3%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Hypertension – NICE guidelines on management
  • Good Medical Practice – 2013 GMC guidance
  • Freedom of Information
  • OTC supplements and interactions with drugs
  • Normal childhood development
  • Eye disease – acute eye problems
  • Certification – fitness to work / Med3
  • Osteoporosis – DEXA scan interpretation
  • Diabetes – diagnosis, management (including insulin therapy)

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Our AKT course offers comprehensive coverage of all 3 domains, and is updated after every exam to take account of high yield topics from the examiners’ feedback reports.

Further reading:
Complete Examiners’ report – January 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the October 2013 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the October 2013 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be revising for the January 2014 MRCGP AKT Exam at the moment, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.156204109

Key facts from the October 2013 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 94%
The mean score was 73.2%
The lowest score was 43.5%
The pass mark was 67%
The pass rate was 76.1% (this is one of the highest pass rates in recent years)

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 72.9%
Evidence interpretation – 69.4%
Organisational – 79.3%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Drug interactions for common drugs – statins, macrolides, oral anticoagulants
  • Management of type 2 diabetes
  • Psoriasis – diagnosis and management
  • Oral contraception and LARC
  • Pre-employment vaccinations
  • Incontinence
  • Peripheral vascular disease
  • Dementia – management and diagnosis
  • Diabetes – diagnosis, management, interpreting diabetic blood results

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Our AKT course offers comprehensive coverage of all 3 domains, and is updated after every exam to take account of high yield topics from the examiners’ feedback reports.

Further reading:
Complete Examiners’ report – October 2013 exam

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the May 2013 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the May 2013 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently 135018281examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting your revision for the October 2013 MRCGP AKT Exam, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the May 2013 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 97%
The mean score was 72.74%
The lowest score was 38%
The pass mark was 68%
The pass rate was 71.4%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 72.6%
Evidence interpretation – 76.0%
Organisational – 70.4%

High Yield Topics

The AKT summary report after each AKT exam usually highlights topics that were either not answered well by many candidates, or that although were tackled well, were important enough to be mentioned by the examiners. This is usually a clue that these topics will be retested in the next few sittings of the exam.

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Management of hypertension
  • Fitness to work certification (sick notes)
  • Drug interactions
  • Skin lesions – recognising common and serious conditions
  • Screening programmes
  • Drug monitoring – blood tests
  • Enteral feeding – including complications
  • Emergency contraception
  • Diabetes – diagnosis, management, interpreting diabetic blood results

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Further reading:
Complete May 2013 AKT Summary report

MRCGP AKT Exam Revision – High Yield Topics from the January 2013 AKT Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the January 2013 AKT Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently 867805_inhalerexamined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting your revision for the May 2013 MRCGP AKT Exam, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the January 2013 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 93.5%
The mean score was 70.7%
The lowest score was 33.5%
The pass mark was 66%
The pass rate was 68.7%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 70.6%
Evidence interpretation – 66.9%
Organisational – 75.2%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from this diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Adverse effects for common drugs
  • Administration of drugs by non-prescribers
  • Drug dosage calculations
  • Oral contraception and LARC
  • Paediatrics – recognising normal findings
  • Asthma management in children
  • Colorectal cancer – screening and diagnosis
  • Breast cancer – screening, diagnosis and referral
  • Diabetes – diagnosis, management, interpreting diabetic blood results

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examination, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

Emedica Alumni can get a £20 discount off the Emedica MRCGP AKT course by entering this code when booking: alumnimrcgp

Further reading:
Complete January 2013 AKT Summary report

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the April 2012 Exam

MRCGP AKT Exam – High Yield Topics from the April 2012 Exam

Dr Mahibur Rahman

After each MRCGP AKT examination, the examiners release a report highlighting key information from the last exam. This includes pass marks and rates, and also key topics – both those that were answered well, and those that GP trainees performed poorly on. These topics are frequently examined again in the next few sittings of the AKT exam, so it is worth ensuring that you have a good understanding of them.

As some of you may be starting your revision for the October 2012 MRCGP AKT Exam, we thought it would be helpful to look at the high yield topics from the latest examiners’ report.

Key facts from the April 2012 MRCGP AKT exam:

The top score was 93.5%
The mean score was 73.2%
The lowest score was 41%
The pass mark was 68.8%
The pass rate was 67.6%

Scores by domain:

Clinical medicine – 74.2%
Evidence interpretation – 70.2%
Organisational – 68.1%

High Yield Topics

The examiners’ report from the April 2012 diet of the MRCGP AKT exam highlighted the following key topics:

  • Prescribing for children – asthma, migraine
  • Normal childhood development
  • Data interpretation / statistics
  • Confidentiality – insurance reports / ABI / BMA guidance
  • Nice Hypertension guidelines 2011 – diagnosis and treatment
  • Spirometry – interpreting results
  • Cancer – 2 week referral guidelines

The MRCGP AKT is a comprehensive examinations, so it is important that you cover the entire curriculum. Remember that 80% of the marks are related to applying knowledge relating to clinical medicine in general practice, 10% to evidence interpretation and 10% to the organisational domain.

The highest scorer in the April AKT examination was Dr Razwan Ali. He attended the Emedica AKT course about a month before his exam. He will be sharing his AKT preparation tips on our blog soon.

Further reading:
Complete April 2012 AKT Summary report