GP career options: an overview

Once you have finished training, there are many career options open to you. Some are obvious – become a principal in a partnership, take a salaried post, or work as a freelance (locum) sessional GP. However there are other options that you may not be aware of, or may not have considered. These include the Flexible Careers Scheme, the GP Retainer Scheme or even becoming a full time Out of Hours (OOH) doctor. What you decide to do will depend on your personal circumstances, including factors such as whether you are single or in a relationship (and what your partner is doing), your finances, the opportunities in the area you wish to work in and how you like to work.

This article will outline the different options in brief. More detailed articles on each option will be published soon.

Freelance (Locum) Sessional GP

This option gives you the most control over where and when you work, and can potentially be very lucrative. You are self employed, so are responsible for your own tax, national insurance and pension contributions. You can either arrange sessions yourself with practices locally, join a chambers, use an introduction service or work through one of the many GP locum agencies.

Salaried GP

This option will provide you with a fixed timetable and a fixed income. You are an employee, so have certain rights and protections (sick pay, holiday pay and maternity / paternity), and you will not have to worry about tax, NI or pension contributions as this will be taken care of by your employer. Pay varies according to region and from practice to practice.

Partnership / Principal

This option provides stability and is often very attractive financially, although it is a big commitment and you may have to “buy in” to become a partner. You will share responsibility for running your own business. This option often gives you the most control or say over how the practice develops, but also comes with the most responsibility. As well as clinical work, you will be responsible for the business – this can include management, staff, the building and ensuring you meet all the legal requirements in the running of the practice.

GP Retainer Scheme

This scheme often suits those who wish to work part time only. You can work a maximum of four sessions, and if you wish to do extra work, this must be approved. Practices get some of your salary costs reimbursed, and contracts are usually for a maximum of 5 years. The contract includes protected time for CPD.

Out of Hours GP

Many GPs still do some OOH work as it is now well paid, and you can often choose shifts that suit you. This may be an attractive option for new GPs to combine with another option (e.g. salaried or one of the part time schemes). However, some doctors may choose to work for some time as full time OOH doctors, working for PCT or one of the private companies that have taken over OOH provision in some areas. This is extremely well paid (up to £140k per year for 40 hours per week), but the downside is that you will always be working in the evenings and weekends, in what can be a more stressful environment than daytime practice. Working nights / weekends may suit some people (to fit in with family commitments), and there is usually scope to work part time if necessary.

Options, options, options

compassAs you can see, the end of your training is just the beginning of a new journey in General Practice. You have many choices, and your preference may change as your circumstances do. Remember that choosing one option does not usually close the others off to you, so you may locum for a few months or years to see how different practices work, before taking a salaried job. At some point you may choose to join a partnership or combine one of these options with other part time options as part of a portfolio GP career.

For the more adventurous among you, you might think about working abroad, volunteering in the developing world, or even combining luxury travel with work by becoming a ship’s doctor. These options will be looked at in another article.

There is no “one size fits all” solution – none of these options are better or worse, it is about finding what suits you and your situation – this may change over time. You should discuss some of these options with your trainer a few months before the end of your GP Registrar year.

Dr Mahibur Rahman is a portfolio GP and the medical director of Emedica. He is the author of “GP Jobs – A Guide to Career Options in General Practice”. He will be teaching at the Life after CCT: GP Survival Skills course which includes a session with practical advice about different GP career options for new GPs.

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